Plein-Air at Addison Farm Vineyard

Aside

October 7 – 9, 2016   9am – 5pm

Plein-air Workshop with John Mac Kah at Addison Farm Vineyard360 view of mountain ridges, vineyards, and fall color. Catered lunch, free wine-tasting and tour one of Asheville area’s first vineyard. Demos, discussion and instruction. Visit my website http://www.JohnMacKah.com for more information. Register ASAP to reserve a space.  Vineyard & Plein-air

Questions?-Contact:mail@jmkah.com

Painting at Addison Farms

AddisonFall

2015-afv-rhonda

Vineyard Plein Air

Aside

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMay 1 – 3, 2015 

Visit Addison Farms Vineyard – Asheville’s newest family owned vineyard & winery.

Three days of oil painting with instructor and eminent landscape painter, John Mac Kah, Catered picnic lunch is included.Wine tasting (and discount for students) following closing critique.

We are very pleased to be able to paint on this ridge top, southwest exposure with great 360 vistas and  mountain views.

   Register on-line at here or contact me to find out more.

addison_vines2

Art – Craft

Aside

From: An Artist’s Notebook: Techniques & Materials, by Bernard Chet, 1978.

This is an old question, going back to the Greeks…the dynamic relationship between how vs what you have to convey…the exploration of this question drives the search and keeps us painting and creating in some sense and raises lots of other inquiries…

“There are two schools of thought about the relationship between knowledge of artistic techniques and the creative impulse. One argues that artists cannot be taken seriously unless they have mastered the finest points of technical competence. In this approach, the studio becomes a laboratory, with the artist surrounded by paint specimens, chemicals and machines. The other camp maintains that technical expertise actually inhibits creativeness. The artist is depicted as a totally free spirit – one who, wholly ignorant of materials, can create on impulse works of art out of whatever lies at hand. Somewhere between these two extremes lies a compromise….”

“The anti-craft attitude may be a response to the mystery that has been made of technical practice….On the contrary, there exists a close interrelation between the freshness of creation and new utilization of media. Knowledge of technique is not inhibiting, nor is it a guarantee of achievement. At best, mastery of craft supplies a working vocabulary–one that opens possibilities to be fulfilled by the individual vision of the artist.”